Teacher Feature: Chris Wells

Chris+Wells%2C+special+ed+math+teacher%2C+visited+the+beach+with+his+wife+and+three+children+over+summer+vacation.
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Teacher Feature: Chris Wells

Chris Wells, special ed math teacher, visited the beach with his wife and three children over summer vacation.

Chris Wells, special ed math teacher, visited the beach with his wife and three children over summer vacation.

Photo courtesy of Chris Wells

Chris Wells, special ed math teacher, visited the beach with his wife and three children over summer vacation.

Photo courtesy of Chris Wells

Photo courtesy of Chris Wells

Chris Wells, special ed math teacher, visited the beach with his wife and three children over summer vacation.

Abby Blazevic, Co-Editor-in-Chief

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Something that students and staff might not know about Chris Wells, special ed math teacher, is that he is part of a large family. He and his wife also have three young children.
“I am the oldest of 50 grandchildren from 14 aunts and uncles on my mom’s side,” Wells said.
In high school, Wells was a contributor to many athletic seasons including basketball, baseball, and football all four years. He now participates in after school sports as the sophomore boy’s baseball coach.
“Coach Wells does an amazing job working with our student-athletes here at Plainfield Central. We are lucky to have him on the baseball staff,” John Rosner, varsity baseball coach, said.
After high school, Wells attended the University of St. Francis to receive a teaching degree.
“I’ve always wanted to be a teacher ever since I could remember, Wells said. “Coming from a large family, I was always around kids and liked it.”
Wells has set a great example for teachers in the building.
“Mr. Wells is a fantastic math teacher who puts his students first,” Joe Schertz, assistant principle for special ed, said.
Outside of his career, Wells also has a goals he wants to achieve, such as visiting all of the baseball parks in the Major Leagues.
If he could go back in time, the advice he would give himself would be to not care what other people think of him.
As a teacher, Wells’s advice for his students would be to perceive failure in a new light.
“It is okay to fail because that means that you are trying every day,” Wells said.

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